Banding

Why Weka are Banded

Since the first banding schemes started in 1947, over 1.3 million birds from 241 different species have been banded throughout New Zealand. About 400,000 of these have been recovered, dead or alive.

When a band is recovered from a dead bird or recorded from a captured bird, researchers are able to learn much about the bird.

Each band returned adds another item of information, such as how far the bird has travelled and how old it lived for and may even mean an entirely new discovery.

Metal bands are the most common form of banding carried out within New Zealand. Each metal band is stamped with a different number and the Department of Conservation, the Dominion Museum or National Museum of New Zealand address.

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Wildlife Act Authority

Bird banding in New Zealand is controlled under the Wildlife Act 1953, and the Wildlife Regulations 1955. An authority (Wildlife Act Authority) is required before people other than DOC staff can capture, handle, mark or band protected, or partially protected bird species.

 

Information from http://www.doc.govt.nz/our-work/bird-banding/why-band-birds/

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